THE EARLY
KLOCK FAMILY
OF THE
MOHAWK VALLEY

Amongst the many lingering questions concerning the early Palatine Families of the Mohawk Valley is the structure of the early Klock Family of the Mohawk Valley. For decades researchers have struggled with identifying the family structure of the first two generations of Klocks in the Mohawk Valley of New York. Thanks to recently found primary records, a new structure is identified for these early families.

Over the decades genealogists have struggled with the idea that the Palatine Immigrant, Hendrick Klock was married four times, fathering fifteen children, and yet departing this world as a widower of fifteen years. This Hendrick has long been assumed to have been born in Germany in the year 1663 and to have died 1760, in the Palatine District of then Albany County, New York at the age of 97 years. The dating of his life-span coming from a gravestone reading "Here Ley H K 1760 97".

Using Henry Z Jones Junior's excellent "Palatine Families of New York", Kathleen McLaughlin of Bowling Green gives a synopsis of the life of Hendrick Klock [hereafter Henry] of Palatine:


H. K. Born in 1663/1668. He died in 1760. Buried in 1760 in Klock Churchyard, St. Johnsville, Montgomery Co., NY. reads Here Ley HK 1760 92.

The only tangible evidence of Henrick's lifespan (1633-1760) is a tombstone which was probably carved long after the fact since the early settlers were German speaking and the tombstone which states "Here Ley HK 1760 92 (or 97)" was carved in English. His age at death was apparently recorded as 97y in John Beekman Klock's Bible. John B. Klock was a member of the fifth generation. Can you recall the details of your ggggrandfather's life? The stories of HK of the tombstone and his numerous wives is not documentable and appear to have developed by combining stories of two or three generations of Henry Klocks. The result is the story of a superhuman Henrick Klock, married four times, leaving minor children, having been a widow 14 or 15 years and dying at 92 or 97. I am not at all sure that this superhuman Henry ever existed.

What we do know, is, as Hank Z. Jones reports, that there may have been two Henry Klocks among the Palatines of 1710. One Henry Klock with 2 persons in his family sailed on the ship "Martha", returning to Holland on 27 Feb 1710, and, perhaps a second Henry Klock with one person over 10 and three persons under ten was enumerated on the Hunter lists of 30 June 1710 and subsequently on 4 Oct 1710 An: Gertr: Bromwasser's subsistence was added to his household. He was listed on 24 Dec 1711 with Mar: Schopfern. And, Simmendinger lists Heinrich Glock and Maria Margaretha were at Neu-Quunsberg ca 1716/1717 with there 4 children.


Jones notes that the said Henry Klock first made his only appearance in the "New World's" church records, aside from Reverend Simmindinger's Register, in the West Camp Lutheran Church on October 30, 1711 when Hendrick Klock & his wife, Maria Margaretha, had a son named Johannes baptized.

"The Palatine Families of New York", by Henry Z Jones, Junior, notes that a Hendrick Klock, age 14, was confirmed in the Village of Grävenswiesbach, Germany in 1685 (1:288) . This same community was noted by Mr. Jones to have been the probable origin of the Laux [Loucks, Louk] Family of the Mohawk Valley (ditto). If this is the eldest Hendrick Klock of the Mohawk Valley, then the 1760 gravestone which reads "Here Ley H K1760 97" is not the gravestone of the immigrant, as his apparent birth-date was circa 1771 versus 1763.

In "Even More Palatine Families: 18th Century Immigrants to the American Colonies and their German, Swiss, and Austrian Origins", by Henry Z Jones, Junior & Lewis Bunker Rohrbach on page 1701, is a note that a Karla Nurnberg had located a June 29, 1688, marriage record for a Joannes Henricus Klock and Anna Barbara Schulten in the Catholic Church records of the Village of Meisenheim, Germany. A recent e-mail to this author from Mr. Jones pointed out that the Nellis Family of the Mohawk Valley originated in the neighboring communities of Obermoschel and Sitters, Germany and that both are within a few kilometers of the parish of Meisenheim. Due to the extensive interactions between the early Klock and Nellis Families of the Mohawk River, Meisenheim would seem a more probable origin for the Klocks of the Palatine District of Albany County, New York than Grävenswiesbach, Germany. If this Joannes Henricus Klock was indeed the Palatine immigrant then it could indeed be possible for him to have died in 1760. Probate and land records clearly demonstrate that the Hendrick Klock who "died" in 1760 was Hendrick, the son of the immigrant Hendrick.

Previous to now, no known primary or secondary sources have been identified which specifically lists the children of Henry Klock, the immigrant. Thanks to the meticulous work of Marilyn J. Cramer Jackson of Silver Springs, Maryland we now have access to the financial records of the Sanders Families of Albany and Schenectady, New York (publication pending). (1) Within the Sanders' family's exhaustive and minutely detailed accounting we find the following documentation of Henry Klock's transactions. Within a Schenectady Day Book belonging to the Sanders Family is a debit entry of September 15, 1735 for transporting Henry's son, Jurie, home from the City of Albany. Then on February 1735/6 & February 17, 1736/7 Henry's son, Johannes, is noted to have made a charge to his father's account. And, finally, in a Schenectady Ledger entry for July 15, 1742, it is noted that Henry's son, Jacob, had settled his father's account, and much later on February 18, 1752, Hendrick Klock's debt to the Sanders Family was assumed by Jacob Klock.

Along with the above source, is the following affidavit prepared by Sir William Johnson for use against one of his many avowed enemies, George Klock (Sir William Johnson Papers 4:145 [hereafter SWJP]):

Affidavit of Capt. Jacob Klock relative to G: Klocks Proceedings concerning the Lands at Conjaharee -- This Day appeared before me Sir William Johnson Bart, one of his Majesties Council of the Province of New York, Capt. Jacob Klock of Conajoharee, in the County of Albany, who being duely Sworn on the holy Evangelists, Deposeth, and Sayeth that his Brother Hanjost Klock (who lives in his House, and was frequently called upon to be an Evidence to a Deed which George Klock their Brother prevailed upon the Indians to Execute) Declared to the Depont. that the Indians were Drunk at the time of Signing said Deed -- That the Depont. often heard the Indians during this Winter Say, they would not part with, or Sell that Lands which Klock bought of Livingston upon any Account. -- Nevertheless the Depont. understands, that since [that] time, several Indians by their getting Liquor from George Klock, and Receiving Promises of more, have been Induced to Sign said Deed. -- That said George Klock has been Tampering the whole Fall, & Winter, in Order to Prevail on them to Agree to Sign Said Deed, and that as he the Depont. lives in the Neighbourhood of his Brother sd. George Klock, he has been frequently troubled, and Disturbed, day & night, and Obliged to get up at all Hours of the night to let in the Drunken Indians coming from sd. G. Klock's House to the House of the Depont. -- And further the Depont. Sayth not -- (SWJP 10:621).


By combining the writings of Sir William Johnson, the information recorded by the Sanders Family, and the West Camp Lutheran Church records we have primary proof that the children of Henry Klock included sons Johannes, Jurie (George), Johan Jost, and (Captain) Jacob.

To flesh out the structure of the immigrant, Henry Klock's Family, we have Sherman Orville Klock's "History and Genealogy of the Klock Family" of the Mohawk Valley written circa 1955 (page 9):


Will of Hendrick Klock, dated July 12, 1743.

Know all men by these presents, that Jacob Clock of Canajoharie, County of Albany, and Province of New York, yeoman am held am firmly bound unto Hendrick Clock of the same place, county and province, aforesaid yeoman in the just & full sum of two hundred, pounds current and lawful money of the province aforesaid to be paid unto the said Hendrick Clock for his certain attorney, heirs, executors or assigns, to the which payment well and truly to be made and done, I do hereby bind myself, my heirs, executors & administrators, and each and every one of them firmly by these presents sealed with my seal, dated this twelfth day of July in the seventeenth year of his Majesties reign, anno domine, one thousand seven hundred and forty three.

The condition of this present obligation is such that if the above common Jacob Clock or his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns shall well and truly pay or cause to be paid unto seven of the above named Hendrick Clocks children, namely: Honorich Clock, Johannes Clock, Johangurgh Clock, Conrad Clock, Hannarum Clock, Hanjost Clock and Barvalis wife of Christian Nellis all of Canajoharie aforesaid, and to each & either of them or to each or either of their heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns the just and full sum five pounds of like current money aforesaid being in the whose sum thirty five pounds of current money aforesaid, the four oldest of the said children to be paid their aforesaid respective sums at the expiration of one year next ensuing the death & decease of the said Hendrick Clock, the other three youngest children vis: Conrad Clock, Honjost Clock, Hannarum Clock is to be paid their respective shares at, and when each of them shall accomplish his full age of twenty one years.

And the said Jacob Clock or his heirs, executors, administrators shall well and truly provide and give unto the said Conrad Clock, Hannarum Clock and Honjost Clock, each and either of them three horses, two cows, two sheep and when each of them marrys, one new suit of wedding clothes from head to foot to each of them, and a wedding feast for each of them, and one plow to each of them and it is further provided that if the said Conrad Clock, Hannarum Clock, and Honjost Clock, or either of them should die before they accomplish the said age of twenty one years, then the services of them to inherit his or their share and part of my horses, cows, sheep, and plow, then his present obligation to be void and of no effect, but if any of the aforesaid covenants, articles, agreements and default be made contrary to the true intent and meaning of those presents then to be and remain in full force and virtue.

Sealed and delivered in the presence of us

his

Suffarinus S,"X" Tygert,

mark

his

Johannes X Empty

mark

Geo F. Thompson

The above was transcribed from the original papers in possesion of Elizabeth Normander of Philadelphia N.Y. 1928) grand daughter of Nancy Klock, daughter of Christian Klock and Eva (Klock) Klock, the daughter of Jacob Klock Jr, son of Col. Jacob Klock and his first? wife Elizabeth Bellinger, daughter of Fredrick Bellinger.

Unfortunately, the papers of Elizabeth Normander are no longer to be found and can thus not be substantiated, but from the previously cited primary and secondary sources one can be reasonably certain that the papers are authentic and that the children of Henry Klock, the immigrant, were: Honorich [Johann Hendrick] Klock, Johannes Clock, Johangurgh Clock, (Colonel) Jacob Klock; Conrad Clock, Hannarum [Johann Adam] Clock, Hanjost [Johann Jost] Clock and Barvalis wife of Christian Nellis, and [his children being listed in the order they appear in the bond between Jacob and his father].

The children of the immigrant, Henry Klock, having been clearly enumerated, it comes as no surprise that amongst the fifteen patentees of the December 24, 1754 Klock-Nellis Patent were: George Klock; Jacob Klock; Johannis Klock; Henry Klock; Konradt Klock; Henry Klock Junior; Joseph Klock; and, Christian Nellis [husband of Barvalis Klock] (NYS Indorsed Land Papers, 15:11).

Our attention is now turned to the known facts concerning the lives of Henry Klock's offspring in the order they appear in the Normander Papers with the exception of Colonel Jacob who is placed in order just prior to Conrad, Johann Adam, and Johann Jost for reasons which will become apparent later.

BARVALIS KLOCK. Barvalis married Christian Nellis. She died prior to June 8, 1767 for on that date Christian sold portions of Lot 12 of the Harrison Patent to their sons: Deobald; Adam; and, Christian Nellis Junior and no mention is made of her (Montgomery County Deeds, 7:326; 7:329; 8:88). Barvalis may very well be a contraction of the name: "Barbara Elisabetha" and this possibility should be factored into any research on the early Nellis Family of the Mohawk Valley. For more extensive data on this family one should consult the writings of Kathleen McLaughlin of Bowling Green, Ohio.

HENDRICK KLOCK, a son of the immigrant, made his first document-able appearance in the "New World" on June 9, 1728 when he and his wife, Jacomyntie ____, had their daughter Magdalena baptized by the minister of the Albany Reformed Church, Ph[ilip] and Magdal[ena] Louk standing in as the child's Godparents (Palatine Families of New York 1:290). Hendrick was one of the fifteen patentees which purchased the Klock-Nellis Patent from the Canajoharie Indians on December 21, 1754, of which it is noted that Lots 17, 42, 79, 114 (half of ), & 143 fell to his heirs (Commissioners of Forfeitures Map #7).

Records of the April 30, 1758 the Burnets Field Massacre suggest that this Henry and/or his nephew, Henry George Klock were Indian traders:


. . . four Families, that fled from Henderson's Purchase in the spring for fear of the Enemy, could not get in, and had in their Houses two Indian Traders, of the name of Clock, and six Waggoners that were carrying Capt. Gage's Baggage to the Fort. At 4 o'Clock, all of a sudden, the Houses were attacked and the Waggoners being surprized, run up stairs, the better to defend themselves. The Indians immediately rushed into the House, and killed and scalped all that were below some of the Indians attempted the stairs, but they were knocked down by the Waggoners; they then fired up thro' the Loft, and soon were joined by more Indians who fired many shot quite thro' the House, and proposed to set it on fire, which intimidated John Ehel, a Waggoner, to such a degree, that he leap'd out at a window, thinking to make his Escape, but was soon killed; the other five defended themselves with great Intrepidity, having killed one Indian, until they were relieved by a Party of Rangers, . . . Next morning a Woman came into the Fort that had been scalped, besides her Nose almost cut off, with a wound in her breast, and another in her side. She is likely to recover, related all that happened till she was scalped, and says there was Onondado Indians amongst them. . . . (Documentary History of the State of New York 1:337). (2)


Absolute proof that at least one of the two Klocks mentioned in the April 30th, 1758 was a Henry Klock comes from the Sir William Johnson Papers, Volume Two, page 835:


Fort Hendrick May 1 [1758]

HONERD SIR

Last Night came one Hendrick Clock here who made his Escape from thee Germean flats and Say that yisterday about five a Clock in the afternoon a large party of Indians atackt the house on this Side the Fort and Says he beleves he is the only one that has made his escape as the Enemie was all round them he Saw Sevrll strive to get to the fort but ware all tacken he Saw about 90 or 100 men but by the Noyse he heard beleve theay ware more I have Garret Van Slick & three Indians to go to the Flats this morning by whome I expeckt the Porticalters.

I am Honerd Sir your most

DutyfuII Servent

JOHN BUTLER

INDORSED: the Honerbl Sir WiIIiam Johnson Bertt,

att

Fort Johnson


On May 4, 1759, Hendrick made his mark [a capital "H" with a capital "K" adjoining the left upright of the "H"] upon his Last Will and Testament. Henry's mark being witnessed by the mark of Johs Klock [a underscore with a capital "V" placed on the middle of the underscore to form a "K" lying on its side], Christofel Fúx, and Andreas Reber (Abbott Collection Mss #9691-156). Within in his will he named his eldest son, Johannes, and his son Henry; as well as daughters: Magdalin; Margaretha; Chatarin; and, Elizabeth. Henry notes in his will that his daughters were not yet married. Unfortunately, the will does not direct the appointment of an executors(s).

The aforesaid will divided Henry's real estate as follows: His eldest son, Johannes was to receive the lands at Stone Arabia upon which he, Henry and his wife Jacobany resided, as well as fifty acres tract in a lot of land at Stone Arabia between Melichor Bader and Robert Getoler and fifty acres from one-hundred lot in Stone Arabia and behind Coppernoll Near Casper Kohks Lott according to my Transport along with any Messuages [dwelling houses] upon the said properties as Johannes was directed to care for his mother until her death or remarriage, in whatever dwelling he might choose to occupy. To his son, Henry [Junior], he left the other fifty acres of the one-hundred acre lot in the Klock-Nellis Patent previously mentioned, however Henry [Junior] was to have his choice of which half. The will stipulates, however, that if Henry [Junior] were to defer the choice of which fifty acres to possess, he was to receive his father's residual holdings in the Klock-Nellis Patent.

Henry's daughter, Magdalin was 20; his daughters Margaretha and Chatarin to each receive 25; and Elisabeth who was to receive 30, in money which Said Money Layd in Albany If in Case the money is Not taken or Lost by the Enymies.

Montgomery County Deed 1:155, dated September 27, 1765, documents that Lenard Helmer, Savinus Tygert, and Jost Klock acting as powers of attorney for the heirs of Henry Klock, deceased; in conjunction with Henry Klock of Palatine as well as the representatives of Patentees Johannes Hess, deceased; Henry Walrath, deceased; George Windecker, deceased; and, Godfried Helmer, deceased transferred title to Lots 6, 67, 105, 136, and the southwestern moiety of Lot 120 of the Klock-Nellis to Philip Koch. Thus, proving that Henry Klock, son of the immigrant Henry, was deceased prior to 1765 and that he had transferred his title to his son, Henry.

JOHANNES KLOCK, a son of the immigrant, was baptized per the records of the West Camp Church in 1711 (Palatine Families, 1:288-90). He was noted by the Sanders Family to have been in the Schenectady/Albany area on February 2, 1735/6 & again on February 17, 1736/7 when he made charges to his father's account. He is said to have married Anna Margaretha Fuchs [Fox], but no positive proof of this marriage can be ascertained.

On November 10, 1742, Johannes purchased Lot 11 of the Harrison Patent from John Wendell of Boston, Massachusetts (Montgomery County Deed 5:420). It was upon this tract that Johannes erected , circa 1750, a stone house which remains extent in 2009 as "Fort Klock". The home is currently owned by Fort Klock Historic Restoration of Saint Johnsville, New York and is open to the public [see www.fortklockrestoration.org for dates and times]. The property being open to the public [refer to www.fortklockrestoration.org for dates and times].

Johannes was one of the fifteen patentees of the Klock-Nellis Patent of December 21, 1754 and he is noted to have been in possession of Lots 33, 65, 72, 152, 163 (half of) of the patent during the American Revolution (Commissioners of Forfeitures Map #7).

The date & place of Johannes' death are unknown. However, on May 1, 1787 Johannes deeded to his sons, Johannes Junior and Jacob Johannes, the bulk of his real estate holdings in Lot 11 of the Francis Harrison Patent, a four acre island in the Canajoharie Patent adjoining his property, and the southwest half of Lot 65 in the Klock-Nellis Patent (Montgomery County Deeds 1: 497 & 2:441). These aforesaid deeds exempted to Johannes, their father, a wagon road running through the length of Lot 11. Thus, we have positive proof that Johannes was yet living in 1787 and, that he considered himself as being capable of some travel.

In light of the above transaction it is curious to note that Certificates of Quit Rent Remission were issued to Johannes' sons: Hendrick; Jacob J.; and John J. Klock for 150 acre portions of Lot 11 of the Harrison Patent on December 29, 1786 (New York State Archives, Collection #A1211). While one would assume that this indicated that Johannes had expired prior to 1786, it could equally well demonstrate a bit of insight on the part of Johannes as the later Quit Rent Act of 1787 would exempt up to 150 acres of land owned by any one taxpayer for life if the said taxpayer was found to be in possession of such a certificate.

JOHANGURGH (GEORGE) KLOCK, was born circa 1708/9. He is first mentioned in his father's account with the Sanders Family on September 15, 1735, when the Sanders Family billed his father for returning him Albany. He married circa 1738, Margaretha Walrath, daughter of Hendrick Walrath of Canajoharie District (un-probated copy of Hendrick Walrath's Will in the Montgomery County, New York Department of History and Archives). Of particular interest to those studying George is the fact that Sir William Johnson states Klock spoke the Mohawk and language despite his being of German origin (SWJP 8:1008).

George had an operating account with Johannis Hermanus Wendell of Schenectady in the 1740's, but no family details are revealed within his account (NYSL Mss# SC12910).

He is the man for whom the December 21, 1754 Klock-Nellis Patent or Klock's Purchase has become known. However, he was only but one of the fifteen patentees of the December 21, 1754 Klock-Nellis Patent, but was in possession of Lots 5, 55, 88, 116 (half of), 131, & 155 during the American Revolution (Commissioners of Forfeitures Map #7).

George quickly became an avowed enemy of Sir William Johnson of Johnson Hall and spent the majority of his adult life warding off charges of defrauding and cheating Sir William's Indians out of their Onandago and Old Onandaga Castles on the Onondago Creek (Cockburn Family Papers, NYSL Mss #SC7004, Box 4 Folder 2; SWJP 4:143). (3) His problems with the Johnson Family in regards to the Canajoharie Patent are discussed in detail on the "Previously Unpublished Mohawk Valley Documents" page of www.fort-plank.com under a "History of the Canajoharie Patent". At a March 10, 1763, Indian Congress, the Canajoharie Indian Sachem Cayenquiragoa stated that . . . It was reported by Geo. Klock that we were in the French Interest, and that we had taken his Brother, and Killed his Son. Here is the Man now present who knows whether 'twas so, or not, and can prove the falsity thereof --. (SWJP 4:60) . . . This apparently being a reference to the April 30th, 1758 attack on the Burnets Field inhabitants by the French and Indians, some of whom were thought to have been Onondagos.

As there are few other readably available sources, aside from the extant Sir William Johnson Papers, from which to judge the character of George, one must be careful in their assessment of him. It does, however, seem odd that a man who had "defrauded" so many of his neighbors would have his son, Jacob G. Klock, continuously elected to the office of County Justice for nearly 15 years following the close of the American Revolution.

The children of George and Margaretha Klock, as enumerated in Montgomery County, New York Deed 1:400 were: Jacob G., Catherine, George G., [EDITED IN A COMMA] Margaret, Anna G., Elisabeth; and Magdalena. As the Germanic pattern of using a child's father's Christian name or the first initial of his Christian name was strictly adhered to in the mid 18th Century Mohawk Valley, it is believed that the Klock-Nellis Patentee Henry G. Klock was a son of Johangurgh and Margaretha and that he was the "son" which was killed by the Indians on the German Flatts in 1758, as no record can be found of him other than his involvement in the Klock-Nellis Patent [KDJ].

On April 16, 1757 he purchased the northern or western moiety of Lot 13 of the Francis Harrison Patent from Evert Harmanus Wendell of Albany (Albany County Deed 7:89), but this parcel was in the possession of one of his sons, George G. Klock, by the end of the American Revolution.

During the American Revolution, George is said to have occupied a 150 acre farm in Lots 16 & 17 of the Francis Harrison Patent and his son, Jacob G. Klock, an additional 150 acre farm in the said Lot 16 & 17 (New York State Archives Collection #A1211). N. B. Map #[edit in] of the New York State Commissioners of Forfeitures Map Collection (New York State Archives Collection #[edit in] suggests that "Old" George occupied Lot 17 while his son Jacob G. Klock occupied Lot 16. George Klock's ownership of Lot 17 during of the American Revolution is significant in that Thomas Blaisdell states in his Revolutionary War Pension Application that Sir John Johnson's Corps was defeated by the Rebels on the farm of George Clock on October 19, 1780 and that the enemy crossed the river there (RWPA #S958). With this description of "Klock's Field" in mind, it is fascinating to note some of the September 23, 1765 description of a land estate which was mortgaged by Juria Klock to the widow Margrit Schuyler of the City of Albany, James Van Cortlandt and his wife Elizabeth [Schuyler], and others in Albany County, New York Mortgage 2:24:


. . . two Just and full equal third parts of two Lots of land number sixteen and Seventeen (excepting there out four Hundred forty Eight acres heretofore sold by the said George Klock to Adam Walrath) which said two third parts are to begin by the River in the division Line of the said Lott Number sixteen and Lott Number Fifteen and to runn westerly up along the said River untill two third parts of the low land of the said two Lotts Number Sixteen and seventeen are included then to runn north Forty nine Degrees East to the Road which said road Leads over the River then along the said Road to the House of Adam Klock and Adam Carol Garlock then with a northwest west Course to a runn of water of water Called Nellises Kill then the same course so far untill one mile and a Quarter is full from the said River on a Straight Line then Southeasterly to the Division Line of said Lotts No sixteen & Fifteen then south Fifty two degrees west to the said River to the place where it began and the remainder of the said two Lots No 16 & No 17 which lays beyond the mile and a Quarter is to be laid out into Lots of one hundred Acres of which the two thirds parts are to be part of the hereby granted Premisses . . .


Thus it was upon the lands of Sir William Johnson's avowed enemy, George Klock, that Johnson's son, John, was defeated by American Patriots and forced to make a dangerous night crossing of the Mohawk River [see Benjamin Wright's 1803 Survey of the Mohawk River in the Oneida Historical Society for the exact location of this road which crossed the Mohawk]. The Revolutionary War Pension Application of George Saltsman, RWPA #W22152 states that his first tour of duty in the Revolutionary War was at . . . Fort Timmerman Vizt George Klocks near the fort. . . . And on September 20, 1833, John L. Nellis stated in behalf of the said Saltsman that . . . the first Service rendered by the Applicant [George Saltsman] he can recollect was, latter part of February 1780 When Ordered Out, & marching to Fort Timmerman, & Stationed Under Capt Miller At the Stone house of George Klocks, On an Alarm, expecting Incursion by the Common Enemy 14 days. . . . This further confirms Revolutionary War home site of George Klock.

A "Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of Judicature: and in the Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Corrections of Errors in the State of New York", published in the early Nineteenth Century [hereafter SCJ], documents the death of George in 1787 (SCJ 13:367 &16:314) .

JACOB KLOCK. Jacob Klock was probably born no earlier than July 13, 1720 and no later than July 12, 1722. These dates were calculated by using first An Act for the better regulating the Militia of the Colony of New York on passed April 1, 1775, which specified that all males over the age of sixteen, but less fifty were to be enrolled in the Colonial Militia and that all men between the ages of fifty and sixty were to be associated with the Militia in companies commanded by officers which they would be allowed to elect. This same "Act" required that the men of "questionable age" swear under oath that they were older than age sixteen and less than sixty-one years of age (Laws of the Colony of New York, 5:732). No change in the ages of men required to serve is found in the subsequent Acts of April 3, 1778; March 13, 1779; and, April 4, 1782 (Laws of the State of New York, 1:70; 1:136; 1:442). This earliest possible date also assumes that Colonel Klock did not retire from the Militia until after July 13, 1781, the date he is last noted to have been in command of the Palatine District Regiment of Tryon County (The Public Papers of George Clinton, 6:789-90). The latter possible date for the birth of Jacob is calculated from Sherman Orville Clock's "History and Genealogy of the Klock Family" of the Mohawk Valley written circa 1938 (page 9), which cites a July 12, 1743 bond found in the papers of Elizabeth Normander of Philadelphia, Jefferson County, New York stating that:


On the 8th day of July, four days prior to the drawing of the above, we find that Hendrick Clock conveyed to the above Jacob Clock 325 acres of land more or less, the consideration being 250 pounds, the exact amount paid by Hendrick Clock and Christian House for lot No 13 of the Harrison Patent, and on the same date (July 8th, 1743) we find a bill of sale given to Jacob Clock from Hendrick Clock for: One negro slave, man named Dick, age about 24 or 25 years, and all his stock, farming tools, household goods etc, reserving for himself 1 horse and 1 cow.

Witnessed by Signed

His His

Sufferenus "S D" Dygert. Hendrick "H" Clock.

Mark Mark

His

Johannes "HE" Empty.

Mark


Jacob was one of the fifteen patentees of the Klock-Nellis Patent of December 21, 1754 and is noted to have been in possession of Lots 20, 34, 99, 109, 111 (half of), 133 of the patent during the American Revolution (Commissioners of Forfeitures Map #7).

Jacob's name appears upon the rolls of the French & Indian War era as Captain Jacob Klock and Sir William frequently refers to him as such in his correspondence (SWJP). He was appointed colonel of the Palatine District Regiment of Tryon County Militia in 1775 and served as such until the fall of 1780.

It appears that he also served for a time as a Justice of the Peace for the Stone Arabia District of Tryon County based upon Sir Johnson's February 6, 1762 list of those to be appointed justices of the peace (SWJP 3:621). There is a possibility that this appoint was for Jacob, son of George Klock, but the animosity between George Klock and Johnson makes it extremely unlikely that Sir William would allow any one from George's family to be elevated to a civil position. And, as Justice Klock, Jacob witnessed an affidavit signed by eight members of the Canajoharie Tribe acknowledging the validity of the Canajoharie Patent to Philip Livingston and Company on December 17, 1762 (SWJP 3:961).

Jacob's military service is extensively detailed in "The Bloodied Mohawk" by Ken D. Johnson, Picton Press, 2000 and many other published works. However, it is noted on July 13, 1781 the Colonel's fidelity to the Rebel Cause had come under close review by the Reverend Johann Daniel Gross of the Reformed German Church (Public Papers of Clinton Papers, 7:74): (4)


The qualifications of the officer commanding the Militia are well known to you. I have only to add that he has of late become very unpopular even suspected. The reason hereof I conceive to be that besides his usual indolence and unconcernedness, his two sons, who have been suspected a good while ago and strenuously defended by him, actually went of to the enemy and took along with them 11 or 12 others chiefly from the Col's Neighborhood. There is a great cry that the Col. has lately sent his sons to Albany to bring up amunition, and when brought has it not yet distributed, and People is left to guess wheter the Sons did tacke it along to Canada in the whole or in part. This mackes the old gentleman so insignificant in the eyes of the whole County, that he is spoken of with contempt. . . .


Colonel Jacob is only known to have fathered three children: Jacob J. Klock, who married Anna [Hess?]; Adam Klock, who married Catharine [Seeber]; and, Margaret Klock, who received a marriage license to wed Stephen March on July 23, 1771 (NY Secretary of States' Marriage Licenses).

(Colonel) Jacob signed his Last Will and Testament on May 8, 1798 and it was probated on 12 Jun 1798 (Montgomery County, New York Will 1:159). Henceforth, he cannot be the Jacob Klock who died on Aug 20, 1805, at the age of 81years, 7 months, and 2 days [born January 15, 1724] and who was said to have been buried in Christian Nellis Junior's plot in the Klock Cemetery of Saint Johnsville, New York.

In his will Jacob refers to his wife, Catharine, as "their Mother and my wife", in his bequeath to his granddaughters, Eva and Anna Klock. Eva and Anna, the daughters of his deceased son Jacob. Eva Klock, the wife of Christian Klock, was to care for her "mother" [sic: her grandmother]. Eva is noted have received the dwelling house of the Colonel along with the westerly moiety of Lot 13 of the Francis Harrison Patent, reserving to her grandmother the cellar kitchen and a room of her grandmother's choosing. Eva was to also receive Jacob's Negro wench, "Sarah", and her sons, "George and Hank"; as well as a Negro child named "Margaret". Anna, the widow of his deceased son, Jacob, was to receive from her daughter's: Anna (Klock) Dyselin and Eva (Klock) Klock was to receive 30 from her two daughters should she ever remarry. His granddaughter, Anna Dyselin, received the easterly 100 acres of Lot 13 of the Francis Harrison Patent along with Colonel Jacob's Negro child "Sarah". Adam Klock, a son of the Colonel, was to receive the usage of a farm upon which he lived in the Abraham Van Horne Patent for the duration of his life, his wife's life, and the life of his only child; but, upon the death of Adam's wife and child, the farm was to be sold in a public venue and the proceeds were to be divided evenly by his granddaughters, Eva Klock and Anna Dyselin. To the sons of his deceased daughter, Margaret, wife of Stephen March: John; Peter; and, Henry Dyselin he bequeathed 15 each.

CONRAD KLOCK. Little is documented concerning the life of Conrad Klock. From the text of his father's will we know that he was not born till sometime after 1722, and was thus born in Upstate New York. He appears as one of the fifteen men who petitioned the Crown for a license to buy the Klock-Nellis Patent from the Indians on July 3, 1754, and thus he had to have been born prior to July 3, 1743 (NYS Indorsed Land Papers, 15:11).

Conrad is noted to have been one of the fifteen patentees of the Klock- Nellis Patent and is noted to have been in possession of Lots 3, 47, 94, 113 (half of), & 153 during the American Revolution (Commissioners of Forfeitures Map #7).

The New York State Comptroller's records (Audited Accounts "A" in the NY State Archives) list him as being a prisoner-of-war from May 27, 1779 through April 19, 1783. Yet, Conrad's name appears on a list of men whom had been formerly held as a prisoner in Canada, but whom had been allowed to return home on parole prior to February 20, 1782 (First Battalion of Pennsylvania Troops, Microfilm M246, Reel 80, Jacket 2, Roll 16 [sic], pages 52-8).

John Zimmerman reported in his Revolutionary War Pension Application (RWPA #W16489) that Conrad's home was located near Fort Remensnyder, which surrounded the home of Henry Remensnyder on 100 acres of land in Lot 5 of Larger Lot 18 of Glens Purchase (Garret Y. Lansing Papers, 8:3). And, Jacob A. Young, also a Revolutionary War Applicant, reports that "Fort Klock" consisted of the picketed homestead of Conrad Klock, which was abandoned by the family prior to the summer of 1781 (RWPA #R11960). Conrad's son, Lieutenant Jacob C., also appears on the 1782 List as a prisoner. In August of 1782, Jacob C. Klock, returned to the Mohawk Valley as a member of a raiding party commanded by his cousin, Lieutenant Jacob J. Klock, and surrendered himself to the men of the Palatine District Regiment of Militia (Deposition Jacob House in favor of Jacob C. Klock in the N-YHS).

The place, and date, of Conrad's death are unknown.

HANNARUM [JOHANN ADAM] KLOCK. From the text of his father's will we know that he was not born till sometime after 1722. Adam's is excluded from the July 3, 1754 petition to the Crown for a license to purchase the lands which formed the Klock-Nellis Patent from the Indians. If one were to assume that he was excluded on the basis he was "not of age" (NYS Indorsed Land Papers, 15:11), his estimated date of birth would be after July 3, 1733 . The records of the New York Comptroller's Records report that Adam Klock was the lieutenant of a company of "Associated Exempts" and that he was reported to be killed in the Battle of Oriskany.

The only clues found as to the residence of Adam Klock is found in Albany County Mortgage 2:24 (dated September 23, 1765) & Albany County Mortgage, 3:195 (dated November 13, 1767) in which Juria Klock of Canajohare mortgages his interest in portions of Lots 13, 16, &17 of the Francis Harrison to the widow Margrit Schuyler of the City of Albany, James Van Cortlandt and his wife Elizabeth [Schuyler], and others; and later to Harmen Gansevoort. The said lands being described as . . . two Just and full equal third parts of two Lots of land number sixteen and Seventeen (excepting there out four Hundred forty Eight acres heretofore sold by the said George Klock to Adam Walrath) which said two third parts are to begin by the River in the division Line of the said Lott Number sixteen and Lott Number Fifteen and to runn westerly up along the said River untill two third parts of the low land of the said two Lotts Number Sixteen and seventeen are included then to runn north Forty nine Degrees East to the Road which said road Leads over the River then along the said Road to the House of Adam Klock and Adam Carol Garlock then with a northwest west Course to a runn of water of water Called Nellises Kill then the same course so far untill one mile and a Quarter is full from the said River on a Straight Line then Southeasterly to the Division Line of said Lotts No sixteen & Fifteen then south Fifty two degrees west to the said River to the place where it began and the remainder of the said two Lots No 16 & No 17 which lays beyond the mile and a Quarter is to be laid out into Lots of one hundred Acres of which the two thirds parts are to be part of the hereby granted Premisses . . . [see also Albany County Mortgage, 3:195 dated November 13, 1767].

Adam is noted to have had a at least a working knowledge of the Mohawk language as he is stated to have served as the interpreter between the Mohawks Indians, George Klock & Jacob G. Klock of Canajohary, Hendrick Remsen of New York [City], and John Van Sice of Schenectady on May 27, 1766; a lease which cumulated in the 48,000 acre Remsen Patent in northern Oneida County (New York's Secretary of States Deeds 21:346).

The records of the New York Comptroller's Office report that an Adam Klock, a lieutenant of "Associated Exempts", was killed in the Battle of Oriskany. The said record, submitted by Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Clyde, reports that his surviving minor children were: Anna; Catharine; Elizabeth; Jacob; and, Henry Klock (Copies of accounts audited By The New York State Auditor General from 1775 Through 1794, New York State Archives Collection #AO870-77, Audited Account Book A, page 271).

JOHANN JOST KLOCK. From the text of his father's will we know that he was not born till sometime after 1722. Adam is estimated to have been born after July 3, 1733 as his name does not appear with his siblings and others in a petition to the Crown for a license to purchase the lands which formed the Klock-Nellis Patent from the Indians (NYS Indorsed Land Papers, 15:11).

Jost was captured by the British in a September, 1778 (Public Papers of George Clinton, 6:726), and he was still being held as a prisoner-of-war in Canada on February 20, 1782 (First Battalion of Pennsylvania Troops, Microfilm M246, Reel 80, Jacket 2, Roll 16 [sic], pages 52-8).

A Joseph Klock passed away on February 26, 1813 at the age of 72 years & 14 days, leaving 13 children and 64 grandchildren (German Reformed Church at Canajoharie). This said Jost would have born circa February 12, 1740/1, and thus it seems quite unlikely that he would have been a son of the immigrant as his father would have been age 70 when he was born. However, it would not be outside the realm of physiological norms for Hendrick to have been fertile even at age 70.

The earliest generations of Klocks in America having been now been verified and documented, further research remains to be completed to sort out the many conflicting accounts of the later Klock generations in America.



BIBLIOGRAPHY


Clinton, George. The Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777-1795 -- 1801-1804. Published by the State of New York. Albany and New York: Wynkoop Hallenbeck Crawford Company, 1899-1904. 8 vols.

Clock, Sherman Orville. History and Genealogy of the Klock Family. Privately Published. Circa 1936. A copy is housed in the New York State Library.

Commissioners of Forfeitures Maps. New York State Archives, Albany, New York. Manuscript Collection #AO273.

Fernow, Berthoud. Documents Relative To the Colonial History of the State of New-York. Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company, Printers. 1856. Volumes 1-15.

Jones, Henry Z, Junior. The Palatine Families of New York.

Johnson, William. Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of Judicature: and in the Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Corrections of Errors in the State of New York.

Lansing, Garret. "Certificates of Quit Rent Remission." Mss. Garret Lansing Papers. New York State Library, Albany, New York. Manuscript Collection #KT13324.

New York State Historian. The Papers of Sir William Johnson. Albany: The University of the State of New York. 1925.

New York, The State of. Certificates of Quit Rent Remission. The New York State Archives Collection #A1211. The New York State Archives, Albany, New York.

New York, The State of. Copies of accounts audited By The New York State Auditor General from 1775 Through 1794, New York State Archives Collection #AO870-77, Audited Account Book A, page 271.

O'Callaghan, E. B., M. D., LL. D. Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New-York. Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company, Printers. 1856. Volumes 1-5.




ENDNOTES

1. Misses Jackson can be contacted at: mjackson@ix.netcom.com.

2. See the statement of Cayenquiragoa, a Canajoharie Indian, found later in this essay under George Klock for an indication of the fate of these two Klocks.

3. This creek is now (2009) known as the Nowadaga Creek, the Indian Castle Church edifice stands near its eastern bank.

4. This refers to Colonel Jacob's sons: Jacob and Adam deserting to the British Cause along with Nicholas Rosacrans; Nicholas Herkimer; Phillip Helmer; Henry Hennick; John Ankirk; Thunis Flander; John Pinkel; John Pinkel Jr; Mathias Wormout; Jacob Youker; John Casselman; Bartholomew Casselman; Jacob Waver from [Canajohary] and John Sarvus from Warensbrugh and going off voluntarily with the enemy to Canada on July 1, 1781 (Henry Glen Papers, NYPL).